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Concert Guide :: “The Best of My Works”: Tchaikovsky’s “Pathétique”

Jonathan Icasas, 06/21/2014

Can you find the delivery truck? If you can, send an email to listenerswelcome@seattlephil.org telling us where you think it’s hiding in this picture and you'll get a free pair of tickets to any concert in our upcoming 2014-2015 season! You have until 31 December 2014 to send us your answer, and the first correct answer wins!

It’s hard to believe we’re at the end of yet another concert season, but this year has been one of trying a few new things—rolling with the punches that community arts organizations face on occasion, but we’ll elaborate more on that in a later post. For now, we’re less than 24 hours away from tomorrow’s concert and based on the level of excitement (especially in the last two rehearsals), we can’t wait to bring this concert to you.



Not only are we featuring our woodwind section in Beethoven’s Zapfenstreich March, we’ll also be featuring Seattle Symphony Associate Concertmaster Emma McGrath in Britten’s Violin Concerto. We could barely contain ourselves during our two rehearsals with her, and we sure hope you’ll feel the same way, too! This season, we’ll be closing with Tchaikovsky’s 6th and final symphony, the “Pathétique.” It's a symphony that ends quietly, but we're thinking about it in a "close one chapter and start a new one" kind of way (and that I’ve been sitting on this piece of information for a LONG time and can’t wait to turn loose).

In case you missed it, here’s a video of Maestro Stern talking about the pieces we’ll be featuring tomorrow.



While the information on getting to Meany Hall essentially hasn’t changed, there’ll be a few changes coming next year that, if you take a close look at the program tomorrow, you’ll notice one fairly wonderful change coming for next season that you've helped us make (I know I keep teasing about it, but it really is exciting for us to announce...but in due time!). If you’re not able to make it, stay tuned here, or better yet, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter as we’ll be making an announcement there, too. 

One thing is certain: we couldn’t have done it with out you, we still can’t do it without you, and for that, we can only thank you from the bottom of our musical hearts.



So, tomorrow. We’re excited. Are you?



Regarding tomorrow’s concert, as mentioned earlier, it’s essentially the same, and based on the other things we need to get done in preparation, I’m going to (very shamelessly) copy as much of the previous information as possible:


  
Also remember:

Other pieces of information, inlcuding tidbits on getting to Meany Hall:

Again, please double check and allow for time to get to the hall (and to take care of any LivingSocial voucher formalities, etc.), and also please double check the bus schedules for route times—some routes aren’t operated on weekends or Sundays, and Sundays usually have a slightly different schedule! Also, the Fremont Fair is still happening on Sunday, and the 520 Bridge is also closed this weekend, so be ready for the possibility of traffic jams or any need to use an alternate route (we’re hoping there won’t be any).



Looking forward to seeing you tomorrow!


Upcoming Concert:

“I will never achieve this again”: Saint-Saëns’ “Organ” Symphony: June 2, 2018

June 2, 2018 at 2pm | Benaroya Hall

An ardent pacifist and humanist, German composer Bernd Alois Zimmermann's abhorrence for his country's actions during World War II resulted in compositions that were cries for justice and brotherhood; one work was described as "a protest against what Zimmermann perceived as the 'racial hatred' he saw poisoning society." In his last work, Ich wandte mich und sah an geschah unter die Sonne ("And turning around me, I saw all the injustice under the sun"), the composer employs texts from the Book of Ecclesiastes and Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov to create a harrowing indictment of the suppression of freedom and lack of compassion for one's fellow man. The Philharmonic's season closes with a return to the music of Saint-Saëns – a work in which even the modest composer knew he had surpassed himself, the radiant "Organ" Symphony. A handful of Seattle's leading performers share the stage for this program, including actors Terry Edward Moore and Leslie Law, baritone Charles Robert Stephens, and organist Joseph Adam.

Benaroya Hall

Benaroya Hall houses two performance halls in a complex that is thoroughly integrated into downtown Seattle. Occupying an entire city block at the very core of the city, the development celebrates the vital role of performance events while maintaining the continuity of commercial life along one avenue and providing a much-needed public space, in the form of a terraced garden, along another.

Parking Information is available here.

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Zimmermann

Ich wandte mich und sah an geschah unter die Sonne

Terry Edward Moore and Leslie Law, speakers

Charles Robert Stephens, baritone

Saint-Saëns

Symphony No. 3 in c, Op. 78, "Organ"

Joseph Adam, soloist


Buy Tickets

Buy tickets for “I will never achieve this again”: Saint-Saëns’ “Organ” Symphony: June 2, 2018

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Adult $30
Student $20
Seniors (age 65+) $20
Youth (16 and under)* free
 
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*Youth 16 years and younger are invited to enjoy Phil concerts at no charge when they present this voucher. Concerts may not be appropriate for the very young. Verbalizations from infants and small children disrupt the performance and disturb other patrons.

Seating is general admission. All tickets are held at Will Call unless advanced mailing is requested by emailing tickets@seattlephil.org